Learning To Love Cooking and Eating

How’s your relationship with food?

Mine’s been a life time of ups and downs. I’ve gone from battling allergies as a child along with fussy eating, to trying out every kind of omission in my ‘diet’.

And ugh, that word – ‘diet’.

I was raised on basic peasant goodness, some of which didn’t agree with me or I didn’t like – homemade yoghurt and sauerkraut. Oh yowzer I hear everyone shout, fermented food is good for you!

It is for me, now. But around fifty to forty years ago it wasn’t.

As a teenager I learnt to manipulate the art of eating. I was a flakey, moody kinda teen who soon discovered they were polycystic and felt ruled by their hormones.

This hormonal hold was stronger than my resolve, and I went in to my 20’s spending a lot of time in endocrinology, treated, investigated. I maintained good weight though throughout.

Then I slid. Now in my 50’s, and three years post-MI, having lost weight, I’m back to battling with eating food – loving it that is, the weight has absolutely stayed off. I knew I had to tackle this mind/body thing though.

It’s as simple as this, I think. I’m not sure I understand how to love food, or my body.

I accept there have been all kinds of trials in my life from early years, but I don’t like being beaten by food. I acknowledge that the relationship my mother had with my step father and his treatment of her, angered me throughout my childhood and into my adult life. I became a woman whose mission was to rescue women and children from that experience.

My mother’s way of dealing with his beastly words and behaviour was to care relentlessly and this was through cooking sometimes. I on the other hand, was all for poisoning the mad bastard! (Therein lies a good tale of crime to write!).

But I found Italy (again) and started to believe there was an answer in there, somewhere, so I read and read all things Italian.

After seeing a tweet by chef Jack Munro about how Nigella’s book How To Eat transformed her eating and relationship with food I decided to get it out of the library.

It’s one big book filled predominantly with words, which surprised me. I always saw Nigella Lawson as a tv cook who lured people in to watching her programmes with her dulcet voice, as she happily scoffed leftovers of her recipes at midnight.

By eck, the chef can write!

I’ve poured over the book during the last few weeks and soaked in her words, her love for cooking and eating.

Just one quote here from the Low Fat chapter (which is brilliant), there are many I could pull out from the pages:

‘I don’t disparage the shallow concerns of the ordinarily vain, which, after all, I share. What I hate is all this new-age voodoo about eating, the notion that foods are either harmful or healing, that a good diet makes a good person and that the person is necessarily lean, limber, toned and fit. Quite apart from anything else, I don’t see the muscular morality argument. Why should a concern for your physical health be seen as a sign as virtue? Such a view seems to me in danger of fusing Nazism (with its ideological cult of physical perfection) and Puritanism (with its horror of the flesh and belief in salvation through denial.)’

There’s more of course, much more, in this book that is meaningful, healing and full of love about food – a healthy kind of love. Nigella took what was good from her childhood and put it out there. She has also shared her bad times too. We can do both, I believe and come out on top.

 

Sontag with Green Soup!

Temperatures have dropped suddenly. Whether this will now be the norm for the end of summer and in to the bountiful month of September, is to be seen. Projects are being ploughed through during the long bank holiday weekend. There will be walking too.

Cooking as ever is on my mind and I have much greenery including a giant marrow (gifted to me from an allotment), the latter which will go in a pita sa tikva (search the post on my blog for recipe).

If you are planning on starting to grow your own veg I would heartily recommend perpetual spinach, purple broccoli, spring onions, chard, green beans and peas as easy and generous in yield when grown organically.

This weekend’s soup will be green – including the leaves and flower heads mentioned above, adding in the holy trinity of onion, carrot and celery plus garlic, some herbs. A handful of puy lentils too. Then cornbread with a little spinach.

I have steadily lost a few lbs this month, hurrah!

What else  –  I have returned to editing my manuscript.

Reading – Ishiguro and  work by Susan Sontag – lots of. There is an interview with her in the current Paris Review.

sontag

 

Yoghurt DIY

 

My Bosnian mother made yoghurt. It’s easy, mostly. This was her method.

Milk – however much you fancy, whatever kind you prefer

A small pot of plain yoghurt – any kind

A pan

A glass bowl

Pour your milk in to the pan and bring to almost boiling point,  gently whisking as you go.

Let it cool down slightly and then pour in to the bowl.

Add the yoghurt from your bought from the shop pot and stir.

Place the bowl somewhere nice and warm. Today in the heat of the heady sun, my bowl is outside covered over by a plate.

Leave it for a few hours to get all cultured.

There will be two layers forming in the bowl. The bottom white solid-looking stuff is the yoghurt. The top creamy-yellow water that’s slightly foamy on top is just that!

Once you have a yoghurt that you are happy with, you can pour away the water or mix some of it in. The longer the yoghurt is left to get all cultured the stronger it will taste. Once you are happy with it, pop your home-made yoghurt in the fridge and eat within two weeks.

You can start the process all over again then from your own yoghurt.

If you want to be exact, there are temperature guidelines, but it’s OK to go by intuition.

yoghurt