OCA Learning Log Assignment Two

With this assignment I began researching collage artists, mostly female. Having never studied collage before, I was introduced to a whole new way of thinking and making that I hadn’t tried since childhood. I had never noticed collage or if it was present in exhibitions, had never looked closely.

 

 

 

Artists I came across were Hannah Hoch, Eileen Agar, Kara Walker, Wanchegi Moto, Nancy Spero and Sonia Delaunay. The latter I knew through her work in colours, shapes and fashion design.

I initially conducted research online, through my own general art books and then located books at Leeds Central Library, attached to the gallery. They have an art library. Accessing books is quite difficult at Foundations level as we don’t have an online resource to turn to. Art books are also notoriously costly. Leeds Art Library came to my rescue.

I took a morning to spend in the Leeds building and the opportunity to seek out collage in current exhibitions. In Abstracts in 1930’s Britain I found Frances Butterfield, Jacob Kramer, Cecil Stephenson, all of whom used collage as a means of expression.

I searched out Nancy Spero. She seemed to work in the moment and moved further away from Western art. She was known for her feminism. 

 

Hannah Hoch  – Hannah took photos from other sources and made images from them, creating photo montages. Her lines are sharp and hard and she connected them through colour. She enjoyed playing with dimensions. This collage made me laugh when I first saw it! It’s a great example of humour through collage.

 

 

I then looked at Eileen Agar’s work. Her approach was to use mixed media, layering paint with collage. Her work reminds me of Matisse’s work – fluid shapes.

All three artists manipulate collage very differently, it was inspirational to discover them and research their work.

I chose  Time for Tea but with coffee. I mixed words with found papers. It felt a little cheeky cutting up other people’s work, art postcards, brochures from creative writing courses and I have to say that initially I struggled with this, but these were the materials I had. I kept remembering Hoch and that working in collage in this way was fine, it did also lend itself to a rebellious approach to art. So much can be said with simple imagery.

The items were a coffee pot, small cup with saucer and shot glass. I also started a sketch book to formulate ideas around this theme, none of which I used, but I enjoyed researching and putting together. I kept what I made very simple, thinking more about shapes and sizes rather than colour initially.  I had mostly white paper to work on but found a sheet of blue printing paper and a wax drawing in an A4 sketch pad, which I did some years ago. As they were together I decided to cut up my drawing to create a djezma on the blue sheet.

I wondered about the shapes I was cutting out or drawing and whether it mattered that they weren’t exact  or that things fitted together properly. But there was also something enjoyable about the naivety in my work. I also wasn’t sure if I was interpreting the exercises properly, or if that really mattered either, if I was enjoying a process. Once I let go of the idea of perfection I started to have more fun in choosing from the selection of papers available in my home.

When it came down to working on A5, I suddenly felt that I could use the smaller papers and card to create an object in a more patterned, co-ordinated way, which I quite enjoyed the impact of.

For the last exercise on A5, stripes and spots, I worked on the theme of Italy from magazines. Cutting up photos of buildings, bottles of olive oil and Sofia Loren. It was enjoyable to take apart images and play with them. Interesting to note that it was very easy to tell what they were about originally.

My computer wouldn’t read the camera’s card after having taken photos of the work created. I also tried through another machine. I have been unable to upload them here as yet, but will keep trying.

Bibliography:

Agar,E. A Look at My Life, Methven, 1988

Hoch, H. Picture Book, Green Box Publishers, 1945

Spero, N. The Work by Christopher Lyon, Prestel, 2010

Taylor, B. Collage – The Making of Modern Art, Thames and Hudson, 2004

 

 

Christmas Morning

I love the quietness of Christmas morning, being up before everyone else, no real need to go anywhere.

It’s been many years since I worked in crisis intervention and was on 24 hour call out over the festive period – not so enjoyable, as families feel the pressure. It shouldn’t be like this, but it is.

It saddens me to witness homelessness and on such a scale, in Britain. Every year I ‘do something’, like many, during this time. It’s all too easy to become bereft of home and this shouldn’t be so in our modern, apparently wealthy nation.

We have spent too long squabbling over staying in Europe. Our politicians and media seem to take the p*ss out of all of us, the citizens. Surely this is what binds us together.

I am aware of the rifts in our society, growing deeper – this is how it is before conflict. A slow build-up, a cat amongst the pigeons, the devil that is the rise of the far right. Many refer to the 1930’s. There are similarities.

The difference that could be now is this: We are more aware. We have won many fights against transgressions on humanity. We have learnt the hard way.

We also know what needs to be done to take care of Mother Earth and all her little babies.

On the wall to my right is Desiderata. I read it this morning and reflect on my own confusion, anger, sense of injustice.

Then I pour another coffee.

Peace be with everyone.

Festive Rice Pudding for a Fairy Tale Feast

Sunday morning and I haven’t made a rice pudding yet. I have been mulling over the ingredients, starting with searching out various recipes around the world. Yes, rice pudding is global!

We often dismiss this dessert as a humble dish, but certain ingredients will make a pudding incredibly more-ish.

My mother’s version was simply to simmer it on the hob in full fat milk, then add sugar if needed, at the table. Nanna would bake hers, including knobs of butter – everyone seems to agree that the skin is best!

Today I will make a Festive Rice Pudding for a Fairy Tale Feast with

 unsweetened almond milk – 6 cups to 1 cup of rice

chopped dates, dried figs would be nice too – no need for sugar

vanilla extract, cinnamon, nutmeg, orange zest

butter

A dash of Chambord black raspberry liqueur

It will be baked for two hours low heat.

I am anticipating a festive aroma!

The most decadent version was served to me in the Highlands of Scotland. A Lady Claire MacDonald recipe laden with cream and butter!

Persian interpretations are perhaps the most famous – one recipe has milk, one does not. Rose water and cardamon are added, then the dish is adorned with rose petals, almonds and more. See Shir Berenj and Sholeh Zard https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/331999803767086537/

I found another recipe on instagram from Chile with the naughty addition of condensed milk (okay once a year!) Rick Stein has share the Mexican version on his latest jaunt. And please let’s not forget honey, which is made for this sweet dessert.

My culinary reading for the festive season is Nigel Slater’s The Christmas Chronicles.

Other books on the coffee table include:

Marco Polo – from Venice to Xanadau

Norse Mythology

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Plus a couple in the fantasy and magic realism genres arriving in the post soon.

I intend to watch international films throughout winter – the real, the magical.

Links:

Rick Stein’s recipe from Mexico:

https://thehappyfoodie.co.uk/recipes/mexican-rice-pudding-with-honeycomb

Nigel Slater:

https://www.harpercollins.co.uk/9780008260194/the-christmas-chronicles/

fairy tale feast