The last days of summer – hooray!

My favourite season is almost here and I am looking forward to it.

It’s a bank holiday weekend and the August one is always packed full of events in the neighbourhood – Leeds Festival and Carnival being two major players.

I am staying local and heading to the hills, taking daily walks, studying, reading, writing.

Netflix has a couple of great things on including a favourite film, Like Water for Chocolate and Tokyo Stories.

Then there’s the delightful music from https://meszecsinka.bandcamp.com/album/

Reading and studying Robert MacFarlane’s publications and the latest Joanne Harris – The Strawberry Thief.

Completing a throw with leftover yarns.

There have been many curved balls throughout August to contend with, as some things come to an abrupt end and changes take on a shapeshifting form. Forces are trying to slide things together.

I am asking Mother Earth for synchronicity. I offer personal change and improvement in exchange so I can be a better person. Let there be magic.

 

All roads lead to…

each other and yet we all have our very own. Are you on your path, are you sticking with it.

Looking at the art of knitting, I thought there was just English and Continental techniques. I had an inkling that Shetland had its own style. Then discovered there was Portuguese, Spanish.

Knitting began as the coptic style – one needle threading through loops. Origins may be from Africa and the Middle East. In Europe, Germany apparently heralded the Continental way, which is very similar to Russian.

South America adopted European habits apparently.

In reality, no one can say exactly where two needle knitting began! But as a knitter you tend to be either a picker or thrower of the yarn, sometimes combined. It’s good to know both. Continental is speedy for  knit stitch, great for different colours on one project. English suits purl and decreasing at end of rows. Continental gives an even, neat appearance on knit. English does purl the right way up.

I’m Continental with a Russian slant. I adopt English for certain aspects of patterns. But recently have found Russian patterns, in Cyrillic! That would be like knitting in a secret code. It’s all magical though, isn’t it.

I have spent some time in recent hours researching a fairy tale. This too appears to have different techniques, origins perhaps, and adaptations on the way over hundreds of years.

Whatever stories we choose, or perhaps they pick us, the road they take us on bring us to each other. We all have our own folk or fairy tale, our own favourite. I have mine and it’s been in my subconscious for years leading me to story-making. I have only now realised how influential it is on my main character.

Mexican three bean soup, malted pecan loaf, textiles, for the weekend. Have a good November. It doesn’t matter if you take an alternate route, it makes a story more interesting. Keep writing!

redriding

 

Blow Me Away!

Art reflects life they say. Only today I realised that the poster I have of Egon Schiele’s Four Trees (1917) is very much like the trees outside my front window. All in a different state of losing their foliage. Three are sycamore and I call these the sisters, one is a beech (their cousin).

The dominant sycamore is still green, she refuses to turn. She may be younger, I’m not sure. I also noticed for the first time that Mother is commanding the horizon, looking on at her children.

I used to play under these trees, planted on a patch of green which once belonged to a wealthy person. The large house is now under the NHS as a mental health care unit for day visitors. I can’t remember what size the trees were over forty years ago! I do notice though that children still play there, foxes meet and mate, crows and owls communicate.

But no one from the building sits outside, ever.

Beneath the trees is the Tiger’s Tomb. Maybe the grown ups are feart!

egon schiele four trees 1917